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Resident Care

Mar 22, 2016

The Science of a Smile

A smile can go a long way, can't it?

Have you ever felt a little down until a co-worker or friend gave you a smile? It can perk you right up and now there's scientific evidence to prove that there's something to it.

According to a study by psychologists from the University of Wisconsin, people in social situations often simulate others' facial expressions to create emotional responses in themselves.

So a smile (or a frown) can definitely be contagious.

Mar 22, 2016

The Science of a Smile

A smile can go a long way, can't it?

Have you ever felt a little down until a co-worker or friend gave you a smile? It can perk you right up and now there's scientific evidence to prove that there's something to it.

According to a study by psychologists from the University of Wisconsin, people in social situations often simulate others' facial expressions to create emotional responses in themselves.

So a smile (or a frown) can definitely be contagious.

Dec 16, 2015

Relieving Anxiety During Admission

It can be difficult for both family members and the resident to make the transition into your long-term care facility.

Residents may feel anxious, nervous or scared. Family members may feel guilty and have separation anxiety.

These are all normal reactions and it’s up to you to assuage them as best you can.

The first step is to acknowledge those feelings. Let the resident and family member know that you understand. And then form a plan to help them work through it.

For family members, guilt is number one. There’s a sense that you are ‘leaving’ your loved one. It’s important to assure family members that they are a valuable part of the resident’s life and that your facility is not ‘replacing’ them. Family members may also feel guilty over the relief they feel, having the burden of caregiving removed.

Dec 16, 2015

Relieving Anxiety During Admission

It can be difficult for both family members and the resident to make the transition into your long-term care facility.

Residents may feel anxious, nervous or scared. Family members may feel guilty and have separation anxiety.

These are all normal reactions and it’s up to you to assuage them as best you can.

The first step is to acknowledge those feelings. Let the resident and family member know that you understand. And then form a plan to help them work through it.

For family members, guilt is number one. There’s a sense that you are ‘leaving’ your loved one. It’s important to assure family members that they are a valuable part of the resident’s life and that your facility is not ‘replacing’ them. Family members may also feel guilty over the relief they feel, having the burden of caregiving removed.

Sep 8, 2015

The Power of Stories

Today was one of those days where story swapping occurred. We all took a break and ended up learning a bit more about each other and then went back to work 

Sep 8, 2015

The Power of Stories

Today was one of those days where story swapping occurred. We all took a break and ended up learning a bit more about each other and then went back to work 

Sep 8, 2015

Connecting Residents with the Past

Making connections between present day activities and past occupations and interests is a great way to engage your residents and learn more about them.

This is especially good for dementia patients because it can bring them a sense of familiarity.

So how do you do this?

First, you need to learn about your residents' past lives. Was someone a former teacher or a banker? Was a resident a lifelong gardener or knitter?

Learn as much information as you can so you can tailor activities to each individual. Make sure to include the families in this conversation. They'll have great insights as to mom and dad's likes and dislikes.

Sep 8, 2015

Connecting Residents with the Past

Making connections between present day activities and past occupations and interests is a great way to engage your residents and learn more about them.

This is especially good for dementia patients because it can bring them a sense of familiarity.

So how do you do this?

First, you need to learn about your residents' past lives. Was someone a former teacher or a banker? Was a resident a lifelong gardener or knitter?

Learn as much information as you can so you can tailor activities to each individual. Make sure to include the families in this conversation. They'll have great insights as to mom and dad's likes and dislikes.

Jun 18, 2015

Creating a Volunteer Program

Volunteers can become a huge part of your organization and help alleviate the burden on you and your staff.

But how do you create a thriving and sustainable volunteer program?

First, you need to think about the structure of your program.

What kind of activities do you want to have? How many volunteers will you need? Think about the size of your program and remember not to overcomplicate.

You may want to have 10 new programs, but realistically you may only be able to manage one or two.

Identify your needs and create programs to suit. There’s no point in developing a program that doesn’t get any participants.

Jun 18, 2015

Creating a Volunteer Program

Volunteers can become a huge part of your organization and help alleviate the burden on you and your staff.

But how do you create a thriving and sustainable volunteer program?

First, you need to think about the structure of your program.

What kind of activities do you want to have? How many volunteers will you need? Think about the size of your program and remember not to overcomplicate.

You may want to have 10 new programs, but realistically you may only be able to manage one or two.

Identify your needs and create programs to suit. There’s no point in developing a program that doesn’t get any participants.