STATE OF THE INDUSTRY PRINT

Mar 17, 2017

BOB NUTBROWN

“The number one issue facing healthcare is resources. There is a demand that has to be met with efficient, effective and compassionate care. [Not just any resources] but resources that ensure that innovation is taking place.”

ANNETTE FOUGERE

“Number one would be how we can respond to the complex needs of the aging population that we are seeing. It’s certainly different than the population we saw ten or fifteen years ago.”

DANIEL FONTAINE

“The funding of direct care hours. The provincial guideline[BC] is that care homes provide a minimum of 3.36 direct care hours per senior per day. Over 80% of care providers are not able to meet that due to the fact that they don’t have the funding to provide that care.”

TAMMY LEACH

“There are a number of challenges. The needs of the individuals are becoming more complex. Infrastructure is aging. 50% of our long-term care homes are 30 years or older.”

DEBRA BOUDREAU

“There are multiple issues but the one that stands out speaks to the complexity of care of the residents who are in our facilities and especially the added mental health comorbidities that people are presenting with.”

ANDRE PICARD

“The challenge is how to get the right care to people at the right place and the right time.”

SOLANGE TAYLOR

“Very glaring is the insufficient funding. We don’t have enough funding to meet the current resident needs. We’re dealing with complex care needs and responsive behaviours and we need additional staffing to keep everyone safe.”

JAN LEGEROS

“The biggest challenge we are facing is that we lack consistent reporting mechanisms across the country. The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) collects and reports on quality indicators in long term care across Canada, however several provinces are still either unable to report or can only partially report due to the lack of systems necessary. We cannot move forward to make positive changes without knowing where we are today.”

JODI HALL

“There’s so much beauty in our work and it’s sometimes lost in the all the negativity. It’s very meaningful, it’s very purposeful and having the opportunity to connect with another person and help with their life in the best quality way possible; there’s so much beauty in that.”

JAN LEGEROS

“The people who work in long-term care are very dedicated, very committed to their work. Everyone is striving to do the very best they can with the resources that are available.”

DANIEL FONTAINE

“What is very positive is that we are very engaged with the public. We’re asking questions, seeking feedback and looking to work collaboratively around developing a very vibrant sector.”

CANDACE CHARTIER

“The most positive thing would have to be the people. From the residents and families to the incredible staff who do so much each and every day.”

DEBRA BOUDREAU

“The people who work in the industry. They’re here because they want to be here. People have made that conscious choice that they want to work with this population; that’s where their heart is drawn.”

TAMMY LEACH

“Number one is that our providers truly believe in providing good quality care an enhancing the wellness of life for the people that they serve.”

DARRYL PLECAS

“What I find inspiring is the incredible collaboration amongst all the stakeholders involved. There’s a level of sincere commitment. Everyone is on the same page.”

SOLANGE TAYLOR

“It’s the heart and soul of the staff. The community feels it when you walk in the door. You don’t work in long-term care unless you want to be here and really care for the elders. It’s a special group of staff. It’s such a difficult job and they do it with such grace.”

DAVID CHEPERDAK

“Given all the challenges in long-term care, it’s incredible the quality of compassionate care that is provided in the system especially given how incredibly regulated it is and how limited the resources are.”

DEBRA BOUDREAU

“Get out of the way. Government is here to fund our service and to set standards. That’s their job. Often, those standards are basic and sometimes they work to hinder best practices. I need them to stand aside and let us do what that best practice is.”

DANIEL FONTAINE

“The province has a huge challenge. Thirteen percent of beds in acute care in hospitals don’t need to be there. How do you redirect those acute care dollars into the community? It’s about finding better ways to provide care in the community such as integrated care teams, mobile clinics, etc.”

JODI HALL

“This is one of the most complex social policies we’ve ever faced. We can’t expect government to do this alone. It’s going to take a large number of stakeholders and every day citizens who are willing to step up and take a role. Government doesn’t always have to be the ones driving the program but really becoming deeply connected with non-profit agencies who are already in the community doing the work.”

CANDICE CHARTIER

“They need to provide predictable funding for care and operations and they need to ensure that residents with dementia and other cognitive challenges are being afforded that specialized staff which we know makes such a real difference.”

ANDRE PICARD

“The role of the federal government in health care should be to ensure that peo9ple have more or lesls the same care regardless of where they live in the country. And that’s not the case anymore.”

SOLANGE TAYLOR

“Get away from the bureaucracy. Listen to their stakeholders. We know what we need. They need to recognize our contribution and our expertise. I don’t feel they do.”

JAN LEGEROS

“I believe what would be helpful is for government to consult with long-term care providers. Their ‘on the ground’ assessment of what is needed would be beneficial.”

ANNETTE FOUGERE

“The industry has to be modernized. In order to do that, you have to invest in it financially. We can’t do it with what we have now.”

ANDRE PICARD

“The industry can make itself more visible. It’s about demystifying what the facilities are like and talking about their realities.”

JAN LEGEROS

“The biggest problem we have is lack of information and education for the public. We need to take a more proactive approach in letting the public know the good news too.”

BOB NUTBROWN

“The organizations need to ensure that both sides of the story are told.”

ANNETTE FOUGERE

“We need to work with our sector partners like our health authorities and our governments to collaborate and make an effort to promote a positive picture of long-term care.”

DARRYL PLECAS

“It’s about public education. Many people have this vision of residential care facilities as though they’re places you never want to go. As if they’re prison-like. Well nothing could be further than the truth.”

DAVID CHEPERDAK

“People go to the media when they feel they aren’t being heard. That’s why it is so important to include families of residents in the decision-making process and to make sure that when incidents occur, you have an effective reporting system that ensures full disclosure and communications with families, so there are no surprises. Things then aren’t getting to the media because they are being addressed in meaningful ways.”

JODI HALL

“As a sector, we need to do a better job of getting our messaging out about what we do well. That being said, it can be incredibly challenging to get pick up on these positive stories.”

DAVID CHEPERDAK

“I absolutely believe that long-term care sites in communities should become hubs where an array of services is networked into that community. It’s a no-brainer.”

DARRYL PLECAS

“We have to start getting more creative about how we are going to pay for things. How can we create a more sustainable system? Part of this is focusing on quality of life. We need things like community health centres. Let’s do as much as we can to lessen to need for someone to have to go to a hospital. We all know what to do. It’s just finding ways to get there.”

TAMMY LEACH

“We need a lot more flexibility to be innovative. The system right now is system-centric not person-centric. Although you will hear governments across Canada say their philosophy is person-centered care, to actually deliver person-centered care is not happening.”

ANNETTE FOUGERE

“We need to modernize the infrastructure. We need a model of care that reflects the realities of the people we serve and that means a more flexible way of funding. And we need to standardize the data system to measure resident satisfaction, what the quality of care is, etc.”

DEBRA BOUDREAU

“Today we’re all talking about person-centered care. I think the evolution of that is person-directed. Really listening and following the resident or their family’s directive.”

CANDACE CHARTIER

“The evolution of long-term care is really going to be around specialization. We need to explore what more long-term care homes can do over and above what they’ve traditionally done. We see more campus models and improved cultural programming.”

JAN LEGEROS

“We should always be striving to evolve and improve, no matter what long-term care looks like.”

SOLANGE TAYLOR

“The people. I mean, there’s no question. You work with a diverse group of people who really care about what they do and work well as a team. We know we make a difference and that’s satisfying.”

DARRYL PLECAS

“There’s so much to do, there’s so many challenges. There are always issues but everyone’s trying hard to fix them. I’m proud of our health care system in Canada.”

DAVID CHEPERDAK

“People ask me what I do and a little tongue-in-cheek, I say I’m changing the world. The work that is done each day by everyone involved has a profound impact on people at one of the most difficult transitions in life.”

DEBRA BOUDREAU

“The people. The relationships that develop with the residents , with the staff who work here every day…it really, truly at the end of the day is the human element piece.”

BOB NUTBROWN

“You see people having a good meal, you see people smiling, you see workers providing compassion and care. That’s very rewarding.”

JODI HALL

“This isn’t an easy business to be in. There’s always a lot of challenges. It’s emotional at times. But there’s always an opportunity to innovate and move forward or be creative in approaches and connect with the residents. The meaningfulness of the experience keeps me here.”

CANDICE CHARTIER

“I think long-term care is such an enriching environment. The staffs are history makers. When a home manages to improve a resident’s condition, it means so much to the families.”

ANDRE PICARD


“I like writing about it because it has a real impact on people.”

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